Enclosed land

Enclosed landscape, small, often rectangular strips of land, lumped piecemeal, some smaller than half a hectare, each enclosed by hedgerows or low stone walls in a gently sloping landscape. Ex.: Bretagne (FR), Normandie (FR), N-W Denmark, Wales, S-W Scotland, E-Ireland, Croatia, French: Bocage, see also Semi-Bocage.

Source: MEEUS et al. (1990), p. 307.
Isle of Man, enclosed fields, with stone walls (Photo: Graham FAIRCLOUGH 07/2003)

Isle of Man, enclosed fields, with stone walls (Photo: Graham FAIRCLOUGH 07/2003)

Database entries for Enclosed land

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

 

The history of the Croatian Adriatic landscape is characterized by its borderline position between Mediterranean, Balkans and Central Europe, and consequently, the peripheral status within the great empires or states (Ancient Greece, Roman Empire, Republic of Venice, Ottoman Empire,… [Read more]

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

 

In broad definition = landscapes partitioned by stonewalls and balks in a more or less regular pattern

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

 

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The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

 

Fields can be enclosed by plants (initially planted) or with stones. The stones vary from region to region, according to geological aspects. The origin of the stones (in northern Germany) are the ice ages, which have covered parts of Northern… [Read more]

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

 

[Read more]

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

 

[Read more]

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

 

[Read more]

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

 

Second half of the 14th century: reference of semi-openfields in Mondoñedo (Galicia)
First reference in XVIII century (Bouhier, 1979)
Boom: XIX and first half of XX century
After 1950s: Intensive systems
1960s: Breaking-up with traditional farming
1970s: Agricultural policy
1980s: Expansion of forestry
1986: Spain joins EU: milk and meat production development

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

 

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