Terraced landscapes

(1) This form of land use is plasticized on terraces in order to maximize insolation. Terraces are typical for the whole Mediterranean. Typical plants: wine grapes, olive- and fruit trees (2) Cultivation terraces are notoriously difficult to date. A very few are known from the Bronze Age, and there is rather more archaeological evidence for them in Classical Greece. How widespread they became is still very uncertain.

Source: (1) Definition elaborated by the Eucaland-Project group (2) Grove and Rackham 2001

Agricultural terraced landscapes, mean grasslands as wells as fields, including artificial landscapes like for wine and fruit production. It does not include: artificial terraces from mining or waste deposit, water meadows in hilly regions which also have a terraced aspect, Wölbäcker/Bifang, infrastructure terraces (e.g. roads, dykes, house construction), microterraces by transhumance and/or wild animals.

Source: Elaborated by EUCALAND network for project purposes
Steep terraced coast of Cinque Terre National Park, Italy (Photo: Csaba CENTERI 1997)
Terraced vineyards in Switzerland

Terraced vineyards in Switzerland

Steep terraced coast of Cinque Terre National Park, Italy (Photo: Csaba CENTERI 1997)
Steep terraced coast of Cinque Terre National Park, Italy (Photo: Csaba CENTERI 1997)

Steep terraced coast of Cinque Terre National Park, Italy (Photo: Csaba CENTERI 1997)

4th World Congress on Terraces - Canary Islands 2019

4th World Congress on Terraces - Canary Islands 2019

Database entries for Terraced landscapes

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

 

Artificial terraced landscape date back early and historical findings prove wine cultivation at the rivers through Romans. They already used prepared terraces for the cultivation.

The majority of terraces is used for fruit, olive and wine production in the southern parts of France. There is also nut production.… [Read more]

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

The used name in Germany is Terrassen and for the landscape Terrassenlandschaft, according to their function also Ackerterrassen and especially important Weinterrassen for wine growing. Old names are Stufenrain, Kulturwechselstufen (see fig. 2). An additional historic type is the so called “Wölbäcker”(see fig. 3). There is a huge agrarmorphological ensemble of relief features, related to… [Read more]

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

 

Terraces have been a very common feature in parts of the Norwegian agricultural landscape for centuries. The general Norwegian term for terrace is [Read more]

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

 

Terraces for agricultural land use were established primarily during the Walachian colonisation wave between the 14th and 16th centuries in Slovakia (Stankoviansky, 2003). They either arose spontaneously as a result of long-term plowing of linear plots on milder slopes or they were built intentionally on steeper slopes to prevent soil erosion and movement of sediments downslope during the storm situations (Stankoviansky, 2007).

[Read more]

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

 

Deliberately created cultivation terraces have never been a feature in England (or the UK) but lynchets[Read more]