Hay making structures

Hay making was and still is connected to certain temporary as well as permanent structures. That include: Temporary structures (with subtype on water meadows) and non-permanent structures. Temporary structures with removable elements like wooden sticks inside. Permanent structures on the grassland for drying and for storage, e.g. the Slovenian type but also wooden houses in the Alps (hay loft). Also permanent structures at the farm itself like barns. It includes all structures for storing hay, also barns and even farms.

Source: Definition/Differentiation elaborated by EUCALAND network for project purposes.
Haystacks or Hayracks or further structures related to Haymaking exist(ed) in nearly every country as temporary structure with high visibilty. Here an example from Slovenia, where the "Kozel" are a wide spreaded landscape element. (Photo: Bled/SI, Alexandra KRUSE 2010)

Haystacks or Hayracks or further structures related to Haymaking exist(ed) in nearly every country as temporary structure with high visibilty. Here an example from Slovenia, where the "Kozel" are a wide spreaded landscape element. (Photo: Bled/SI, Alexandra KRUSE 2010)

Database entries for Hay making structures

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

 

Farmers – 100 % a wanted[Read more]

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

Hay making structures have been a common feature in the Norwegian agricultural landscape for a long time. As cool and regionally quite wet climatic conditions are unfavorable for cultivation of plant crops, animal husbandry has always been an important part of Norwegian agriculture, especially towards the north of the country where plant production gets increasingly difficult. Before AD 1900 hay was mostly harvested from outfields, mainly forest and mountain grasslands, while infields were reserved for… [Read more]

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

 

Hay is grass, legumes, or other herbaceous plants that have been cut, dried, and stored for use as animal fodder, particularly for grazing animals such as cattle, horses, goats, and sheep.
Hay can be used as animal fodder when or where there is not enough pasture or rangeland on which to graze an… [Read more]

The entries are still in process, the e-atlas is still under development

 

Dr. Anton Melik was the first researcher of hayracks. He describes the development of hayracks with following words:

Firstly, a pole was sunk into the ground vertically and was refered as stog. Two of such poles (ostrvi) in a row were gradually supplied with a number of horizontal bars and hung with hay. This device was called koza – kozel – kozolec, taking the name from… [Read more]